IJSSH 2012 Vol.2(6):472-476 ISSN: 2010-3646
DOI: 10.7763/IJSSH.2012.V2.150

Where Did the Metacognitive Train Leave the Rails? Putting the Train Back on the Track

Brent Walters and Ching-Ning Chien

Abstract—For the past several decades, the fuzzy field of listening research has focused on strategy research; specifically, the investigation of which strategies proficient language learners use and how best to teach those strategies to L2 learners of lesser proficiency. L2 listening strategy research has broadly developed a three-part strategy classification whereby strategies are distinguished by their metacognitive, cognitive, and social-affective characteristics. The predominant assumption is that the use of metacognitive strategies is correlated with higher listening proficiency, ie., listeners of higher proficiency use a larger number of metacognitive strategies and use them more effectively. This assumption has proven to be difficult to detect and less robust across at larger scales and self-reports of strategy use. The present study reports results of a large scale listening strategy survey which suggests that perhaps a new listening strategy classification, drawn from insights gleaned from neurolinguistic research into brain functioning, be adopted in order to best understand, research, and teach listening strategies.

Index Terms—Listening strategies, strategy survey, metacognitive, neurolinguistics.

The authors are with Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung Li, and Taiwan 32032 ROC (e-mail: brent@cycu.edu.tw, chingnin@cycu.edu.tw).

[PDF]

Cite: Brent Walters and Ching-Ning Chien, "Where Did the Metacognitive Train Leave the Rails? Putting the Train Back on the Track," International Journal of Social Science and Humanity vol. 2, no. 6, pp. 472-476, 2012.

Copyright © 2008-2015. International Journal of Social Science and Humanity. All rights reserved.
E-mail: ijssh@ejournal.net