IJSSH 2017 Vol.7(4): 206-211 ISSN: 2010-3646
doi: 10.18178/ijssh.2017.V7.821

Take Me to the Moors: Mediatised Murder 40 Years on - An Analysis of Granada TV’s See No Evil

Martin King and Ian Cummins
Abstract—The Moors Murders were one of, if not the most high profile murder cases in Britain in the 20th Century. In 1966, Ian Brady and Myra Hindley were convicted of the abduction, sexual assault and murder of Lesley Anne Downey (10), John Kilbride (12) and Edward Evans (17). The victims’ bodies were buried on the bleak unforgiving Saddleworth Moor outside of Manchester. The Moors themselves have become central to the on-going fascination with these brutal crimes – they are a site of memory negotiated through the remorse of horrific events, Lieux d’horreur; places which recall past events with the violence and horror still present, linking the monstrous with a particular place. A prime example of mediatised murder, there are a number of cultural products which re-present the case. This paper will provide an analysis of See No Evil (2006), a dramatization of Brady and Hindley’s crimes, trial and conviction made 40 years on from those events by Granada TV in the UK, establishing the centrality of place to the ongoing fascination and combined cultural impact of these crimes.

Index Terms—Moors, murders, evil, mediatised, place.

Martin King is with the Manchester Metropolitan University, UK (e-mail: m.king@mmu.ac.uk).
Ian Cummins is with the University of Salford, UK (e-mail: i.d.cummins@salford.ac.uk).

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Cite: Martin King and Ian Cummins, "Take Me to the Moors: Mediatised Murder 40 Years on - An Analysis of Granada TV’s See No Evil," International Journal of Social Science and Humanity vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 206-211, 2017.

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