IJSSH 2015 Vol.5(11): 912-916 ISSN: 2010-3646
DOI: 10.7763/IJSSH.2015.V5.579

Gender Bias in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation in Japan: a Questionnaire Survey in Spousal Renal Donors

Miyako Takagi
Abstract—Living donor nephrectomy for renal transplantation has become widespread as surgical techniques. A questionnaire survey of living transplantation donors who gave a kidney to their spouses was conducted to determine their perceptions of living donor kidney transplantation. In this survey, 2 of 3 kidneys were donated by wives. In general, men are breadwinners in the family and women are more often expected to act as donors. From the responses to the question “How much was your intention to become a donor?,” it was clear that wife-donors had lesser intention to donate than husband-donors. In other words, the decision of wife-donors was more influenced by others. Donors were also asked their opinions regarding transplantation of surgically restored cancerous kidneys. This is currently not allowed in Japan. From the result, wife-donors were more tolerant of restored kidney transplantation than husband-donors. Transplantation using a previously cancerous donor kidney may offer some relief of pressure placed on family members, particularly wives, to donate.

Index Terms—Questionnaire survey, gender imbalance in living donor, donors’ perceptions, restored kidney transplantation.

Miyako Takagi is with the University Research Center, Nihon University, 4-8-24, Kudan-minami, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8275 Japan (e-mail: takagi.miyako@ nihon-u.ac.jp).

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Cite: Miyako Takagi, " Gender Bias in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation in Japan: a Questionnaire Survey in Spousal Renal Donors," International Journal of Social Science and Humanity vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 912-916, 2015.

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