IJSSH 2014 Vol.4(4): 311-315 ISSN: 2010-3646
DOI: 10.7763/IJSSH.2014.V4.370

Recipients‟ Perceptions Regarding Transplantation of Surgically Restored Cancerous Kidneys in Japan

Miyako Takagi
Abstract—Patients with renal failure wait an average of 14 years to receive a transplant after registration on the waiting list in Japan. Many patients must therefore depend on a living donor. Between January 2012 and March 2013, a questionnaire was sent to three hospitals where transplants had been performed. We obtained responses from 152 recipients receiving kidneys from their spouses concerning their physical and psychological condition after transplantation and their perceptions of living donor kidney transplantation. Afterwards, we asked recipients’ opinions about transplantation of surgically restored cancerous kidneys as a new source for donor. In response to questions regarding the physical condition of the recipient after kidney transplantation, 78.3% respondents reported that recipients felt good or very good, whereas 4.6% recipients felt less than normal or bad. In response to the questions regarding the psychological condition of the recipient after kidney transplantation, 69.1% recipients reported feeling good or very good, and 3.9% recipients felt less than normal or bad. One hundred thirty-one recipients (86.2%) recognized living donor transplantation as ongoing medical care, and 11 recipients (7.2%) perceived it only as temporary medical care. No recipient thought the medical care which they received to be a problem. In response to questions regarding restored kidney transplantation, 124 recipients (81.6%) recognized it as medical care and 15 recipients (9.9%) perceived it as only temporary medical care. Five recipients (3.3%) thought it had a problem as medical care because of the risk in cancer recurrence. The fact that more than 80% recipients accepted restored kidney transplantation as medical care compares favorably with the results of the survey regarding living donor transplantation (86.2%). Nevertheless, this practice is currently not allowed in Japan. In response to the question, “If restored kidney transplantation had been possible when you underwent the procedure, what would you have chosen, either living donor transplantation or restored kidney transplantation?” a total of 51 recipients (33.6%) wanted to choose restored kidney transplantation, despite the possible 5-year recurrence rate of cancer of 6%.

Index Terms—Living donor transplantation, recipients’ perceptions, restored kidney transplantation, shortage of organs.

Miyako Takagi is with the University Research Center, Nihon University, 4-8-24, Kudan-minami, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 102-8275, Japan (e-mail: takagi.miyako@ nihon-u.ac.jp).

[PDF]

Cite: Miyako Takagi, " Recipients‟ Perceptions Regarding Transplantation of Surgically Restored Cancerous Kidneys in Japan," International Journal of Social Science and Humanity vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 311-315, 2014.

Copyright © 2008-2015. International Journal of Social Science and Humanity. All rights reserved.
E-mail: ijssh@ejournal.net