IJSSH 2015 Vol.5(7): 640-645 ISSN: 2010-3646
DOI: 10.7763/IJSSH.2015.V5.532

Hong Kong’s Mental Health Policy – Preliminary Findings

Anita Chi-Kwan Lee and Gigi Lam
Abstract—People in Hong Kong bear the brunt of diverse types of mental disorder and yet the mental health services in Hong Kong are criticized as seriously insufficient. Psychiatrist F.K. Tsang even lamented about the lack of a consistent mental health policy [1]. The present paper offers the theoretical framework and the preliminary findings of a full-scale research on Hong Kong’s enigmatic mental health policy in the colonial era and under China’s sovereignty respectively. Shedding light on the two-way interaction of government consultation, the theoretical framework is followed by in-depth interviews with the different stakeholders. Initial findings from the in-depth interviews with a small group of interviewees from different sectors have yielded a consensus about the lack of a long-term mental health policy in the governments of both the colonial and post-colonial periods, which only administered and still provide short-term annual budgets for renewable mental health services. The change of sovereignty has not brought about any change in either the philosophy of budget allocation or the process of policy-making.

Index Terms—Mental health policy, Hong Kong, colonial era, post-colonial, mental health services.

A. C. K. Lee is with the Language and General Education Centre, Tung Wah College, Hong Kong (e-mail: anitalee@twc.edu.hk).
G. Lam is now with the Department of Rehabilitation and Social Sciences, Tung Wah College, Hong Kong (e-mail: gigilam@twc.edu.hk).

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Cite: Anita Chi-Kwan Lee and Gigi Lam, " Hong Kong’s Mental Health Policy – Preliminary Findings," International Journal of Social Science and Humanity vol. 5, no. 7, pp. 640-645, 2015.

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