IJSSH 2013 Vol.3(3): 246-250 ISSN: 2010-3646
DOI: 10.7763/IJSSH.2013.V3.237

The Influence of Local Culture on the Ideology of Samoan Journalism

Linda Jean Kenix
Abstract—Much research implicitly suggests that journalism values arise from culturally removed organizational structures and shared occupational training. Further, few studies examine the perspective of journalism from both audiences and journalists. These omissions are important given the essentiality of mutually constructed and culturally embedded normative behaviors within journalism. This research examines audiences and journalists in Samoa, a country purposefully selected as a recently independent, post-colonial, country that relies upon a very traditional, shared national identity for it’s relatively nascent identificatory cohesion. This study aims to gain a better understanding of how local culture can set parameters and expectations for journalism; how journalists negotiate culture into their own professional ideology; and how audiences understand journalism within a cultural context.

Index Terms—Culture, journalism, audience, journalist, hierarchy of influences theory.

Linda Jean Kenix is with the University of Canterbury, New Zealand (email: lindajean.kenix@canterbury.ac.nz).

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Cite:Linda Jean Kenix, "The Influence of Local Culture on the Ideology of Samoan Journalism," International Journal of Social Science and Humanity vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 246-250, 2013.

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